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Child Custody


Minnesota Child Custody Lawyer and Attorney

 

The law firm handles Minnesota child custoday cases, both as a part of divorce proceedings and as separate child custody proceedings or paternity proceedings.

 

In Minnesota, child custody and parenting time determinations are based on the “best interests of the children” factors, which can be found in Minnesota Statute § 518.17, and provide as follows:

 

(a) "The best interests of the child" means all relevant factors to be considered and evaluated by the Court including:

  • (1) The wishes of the child's parent or parents as to custody;
  • (2) The reasonable preference of the child, if the court deems the child to be of sufficient age to express preference;
  • (3) The child's primary caretaker;
  • (4) The intimacy of the relationship between each parent and the child;
  • (5) The interaction and interrelationship of the child with a parent or parents, siblings, and any other person who may significantly affect the child's best interests;
  • (6) The child's adjustment to home, school, and community;
  • (7) The length of time the child has lived in a stable, satisfactory environment and the desirability of maintaining continuity;
  • (8) The permanence, as a family unit, of the existing or proposed custodial home;
  • (9) The mental and physical health of all individuals involved; except that a disability, as defined in section 363A.03, of a proposed custodian or the child shall not be determinative of the custody of the child, unless the proposed custodial arrangement is not in the best interest of the child;
  • (10) The capacity and disposition of the parties to give the child love, affection, and guidance, and to continue educating and raising the child in the child's culture and religion or creed, if any;
  • (11) The child's cultural background;
  • (12) The effect on the child of the actions of an abuser, if related to domestic abuse, as defined in section 518B.01, that has occurred between the parents or between a parent and another individual, whether or not the individual alleged to have committed domestic abuse is or ever was a family or household member of the parent; and
  • (13) Except in cases in which a finding of domestic abuse as defined in section 518B.01 has been made, the disposition of each parent to encourage and permit frequent and continuing contact by the other parent with the child.

 

The Court may not use one factor to the exclusion of all others. The primary caretaker factor may not be used as a presumption in determining the best interests of the child. The court must make detailed findings on each of the factors and explain how the factors led to its conclusions and to the determination of the best interests of the child.

 

(b) The Court shall not consider conduct of a proposed custodian that does not affect the custodian's relationship to the child.

Subd. 1a. Evidence of false allegations of child abuse.

 

The Court shall consider evidence of a violation of section 609.507 in determining the best interests of the child.

 

In addition to the factors listed in subdivision 1, where either joint legal or joint physical custody is contemplated or sought, the court shall consider the following relevant factors:

  • (a) The ability of parents to cooperate in the rearing of their children;
  • (b) Methods for resolving disputes regarding any major decision concerning the life of the child, and the parents' willingness to use those methods;
  • (c) Whether it would be detrimental to the child if one parent were to have sole authority over the child's upbringing; and
  • (d) Whether domestic abuse, as defined in section 518B.01, has occurred between the parents.

 

The Court shall use a rebuttable presumption that upon request of either or both parties, joint legal custody is in the best interests of the child. However, the court shall use a rebuttable presumption that joint legal or physical custody is not in the best interests of the child if domestic abuse, as defined in section 518B.01, has occurred between the parents.

 

If the Court awards joint legal or physical custody over the objection of a party, the Court shall make detailed findings on each of the factors in this subdivision and explain how the factors led to its determination that joint custody would be in the best interests of the child.

Please contact Blahnik Law Office, PLLC if you have any legal needs or if you simply have a legal question that you want answered.


Minnesota Divorce Lawyer & Attorney * Scott County Divorce Lawyer & Attorney

Blahnik Law Office, PLLC, 16180 Hastings Ave., Suite 201, Prior Lake, Minnesota 55372
phone: (952) 479-0449 * fax: (952) 447-4424
adam@blahniklawoffice.com * www.blahniklawoffice.com

Copyright 2011 - Blahnik Law Office, PLLC

 

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